Image from page 487 of “Handbook of birds of the western United States including the great plains, great basin, Pacific slope, and lower Rio Grande valley” (1908)

Image from page 487 of “Handbook of birds of the western United States including the great plains, great basin, Pacific slope, and lower Rio Grande valley” (1908)
buthead
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Identifier: handbookofbir00bail
Title: Handbook of birds of the western United States including the great plains, great basin, Pacific slope, and lower Rio Grande valley
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Bailey, Florence Merriam, 1863-1948
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Boston and New York, Houghton Mifflin company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
rrowerand grayer. Young: like adults, buthead stripes brown and buffy insteadof black and white ; under partsbuify, and chest, sides of throat, andsides streaked. Male: length (skins)5.84-6.74, wing 2.98-3.28, tail 2.68-3.23, bill .43-.47. Female: length(skins) 6.00-6.63, wing 2.89-3.17, tail2.69-3.00, bill .41-.47. Distribution. — Breeds in UpperCanadian zone in the United Statesand Canada, from Quebec and Labra-dor north to Hudson Bay and Green-land and throughout most of the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains,south to New Mexico and Arizona; winters south through the UnitedStates and Lower California to Guanajuato, Mexico. Nest. — On or near ground, in sub-alpine meadows, often in willowsalong streams, made of fine twigs, rootlets, and grasses. Eggs: 3 to 5,pale greenish blue, varying to brownish, spotted with reddish brown. Food. — Caterpillars, ants, wasps, and weed seed, including that ofJohnson grass and ragweed. The white-crowned sparrow is preeminently the sparrow of the

Text Appearing After Image:
From Biological Survey, U. S. Dept. ofAgriculture. Fig. 426. FINCHES, SPARROWS, ETC. 339 mountains. Along the willow bordered streams that run throughthe mountain meadows in the Sierra its thin, sharp chip of parentalanxiety is often heard, and its song dominates the bird chorus. Thesong is composed of two long whistled notes, the first sliding up tothe second with grace notes, the second followed by a lower noterepeated rapidly three times. The two long whistled notes are richand plaintive in tone, suggesting the whistle of the pine woodssparrow, and as they ring through the cool, pure air day after dayseem to give expression to the deep pervading peace and serenity ofthe mountains. 554a. Z. 1. gambelii (Nutt.).Sparrow. Gambel Sparrow : Intermediate Similar to leucophrys, but lores not black,ing- to bill. Male: length (skins)5.85-6.48, wing- 3.00-3.28, tail 2.58-2.92, bill .39-.44. Female: length(skins) 5.73-6.43, wing 2.90-3.25, tail2.64-2.93, bill .39-.43. Distribution. — Breeds

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